Spicy Cauliflower Soup and Pear and Almond Clafoutis

The first creamy soup I ever made, was a cauliflower soup. The reason I remember it is because this soup was included in our new healthy diet I wrote about some time ago. Many things were new and exciting but this particular one stayed with us until current days. It was just a matter of making myself writing down the recipe, as it’s so easy to cook by adding things into a pot and not measuring the ingredients. It is an easy recipe to make and rather seductive in its taste so my guess is that it might become one of your favourite soups.

I don’t really like to use much dairy to achieve a creamy structure of a soup. I had to look for a different option. Imagine my joy when I realised that it is possible to make a creamy soup without adding full cream milk. I was over the moon with happiness! If you are one of those you will love it too! Just a tablespoon of  butter makes a whole difference to this soup – plus a lot of whizzing. It needs to be very smooth!

Another important note – the amount of chillies used for this soup is almost scary, but it’s necessary, so don’t avoid it. It goes nicely with the creamy cauliflower and most importantly it’ll make you laugh a lot while eating and afterwards! At least that’s our experience, and it never fails. On both a very cold, or a very hot day, I promise, you would benefit from eating this soup.

To find out more about cauliflower benefits, visit well-beingsecrets.com.

Cauliflower soup

1 cauliflower

1 onion

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon pepper

3 small chilli peppers

1 clove garlic

2 stick celery

200 ml water

1 tablespoon of  butter

To prep – wash and chop cauliflower. Peal and dice onion and garlic. Wash and dice celery.

In a large size pot add olive oil and once it’s heated add onion, garlic and diced chilli peppers. Cook and stir for two minutes, then add celery. Cook all together for another 2 minutes and add cauliflower. Pour in water and add salt and pepper.

Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes or until cauliflower is cooked. At the very end, add butter and stir until it’s all melted.

Leave it to cool down a little before transferring to the blender. Blend the soup until it is very smooth and creamy. I added micro coriander and some chilies before serving but that’s optional.

The famous French treat was just recently seriously considered as one of the leaders in our family’s world of desserts. Its name is – Clafoutis!

I remember the first one I ever made was with cherries. It’s kind of traditional one and as far as little google research goes, we are to use the whole cherries, with pits, in order to achieve an extra flavour.

While I am waiting for the cherry season to share that recipe, I’ve decided to go with pear and almond Clafoutis. It became so popular that I might never get to make a post about the cherry one, we might stick just to pear and almond Clafoutis. Then again, who am I kidding, a recipe not to be tested and posted – impossible! Stay tuned and enjoy pear and almond Clafoutis while pears are in season.

Pear and almond Clafoutis 

3 eggs

220 ml milk

150 gr sugar

80 gr plain flour

1/2 teaspoon almond essence

50 gr almond flakes

30 gr butter for greasing the baking tin

2 pears

Pre heat the oven to 180C. Grease a baking tin with butter.

Peal and slice pears.

Mix the eggs with sugar. Add the flour and mix well to loose any crumbles. Gradually pour in the milk and at the end add almond essence.

Pour 1/2 of the batter into the baking tin previously greased with butter. Arrange pears and pour the rest of the batter on top.

Sprinkle with the almond flakes and bake at 180C for 45-50 minutes or until golden. Dust with powdered sugar before serving. Can be served hot or cold. Enjoy!

Tomatoes stuffed with ground beef and prosciutto

This dish brings back childhood memories as my mother makes the best stuffed veggies (her favourite are stuffed capsicums) in the whole wide world. There is a tiny secret that makes most of her dishes special. She likes to add bacon, pancetta or prosciutto to all her stuffed veggies, and with a good quality of any of those we always end up with a marvellous dinner. Nothing lifts a dish to a masterpiece as good, cured and preferably smoked piece of bacon!

Now that I’ve presented cured meat as a main achiever in this dish I wonder if there is a point in listing other ingredients at all. But there is! This particular dish wouldn’t be as delightful as it is without good and ripe tomatoes. The smell of fresh tomatoes will reflect in your dish so use the best you can find – always! The good quality mozzarella is another of my favourite parts of this dish. Creamy straight from the oven and almost crunchy just after a few minutes outside of the oven makes it an extra treat. Sprinkle of chopped spring onions brings the freshness to the whole idea of a vegetable dish and we all love it! Hope you will too.

Beef and prosciutto stuffed tomatoes

12 tomatoes

1 diced onion

2 diced small carrot

2 diced stalk celery

500 gr grass fed ground beef

50 gr prosciutto

1 fresh bay leaf

1 teaspoon sea salt

1/2 teaspoon cracked black pepper

1 teaspoon good quality balsamic vinegar

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 pieces of mozzarella

3 tablespoons of grated parmesan

2 spring onions finely chopped

Slice the tops of tomatoes and set aside. Scoop out tomato flesh with a small spoon and keep it aside.

Chop prosciutto to approximately 1×1 cm pieces.

Sauté the onion, carrot and celery with bay leaf for a few minutes. Add the meat and stir until it is almost cooked. Pour in tomato flesh and cook on a low temperature until liquid is reduced. Add the balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper and leave it to cool down for a few minutes.

Arrange tomatoes, cut side up, in an olive oil greased baking dish. Stuff meat mixture into tomatoes. Place tops on tomatoes and top up with small pieces of mozzarella. Grate parmesan on top and bake at 180C for 45 minutes. Sprinkle with spring onions before serving.

Carob cake

Many years ago we moved to New Zealand, looking for new and bright adventures. A new start included everything being new to us. New country to explore, new people to meet, new jobs to start, and new life experiences! Perfect you would say! Except, there was one thing quite old and ruined in this perfect new world of ours, and that was the first house we decided to buy. The house we laid our yes on was neglected and unloved but we were young and enthusiastic back then and thus we thought it should be ours! We thought to fix it and live happily in it for many years to come.

We started with a rather impressive group of builders, but once some walls were removed, French door opened and bathroom and kitchen nicely done, we thought that it was a good time for us to move in! We knew that the walls needed to be done, and a few more jobs on top of that, but thought that we could do it! And we did! The house looked magnificent, at least to us, but peeling five layers of wall paper and a few other jobs were more than we could handle. After just a few weeks of living in the unfinished house we experienced such changes with our health that I had no other choice but to react the only way I knew – we changed our diet completely! All delicatessens and as you can imagine a lot of processed food was thrown in the bin and a new batch of greens (fresh and organic), found its way to our kitchen. So at least we had  healthy food on the menu every day and long walks along the beach (in-between house needing to be finished).

Now when I think about it, I am partially thankful to that experience as eating well is always a good choice. At the same time we could have done without the stress of poisoning our bodies I guess. As I said in the beginning of this story, being young and enthusiastic…can do more damage than good sometimes.

It took us almost a year to finish renovating the house. We lived another two years in it before moving across the world –  again.

While learning about healthy choices, by reading, talking to practitioners and friends, I came across carob as a new ingredient. I loved it from the very start and as carob was another way of having chocolate (that is how I saw it) I had to come up with a cake recipe. At this time we didn’t have a strong network of bloggers and finding recipes was sometimes a struggle. One would rely on books or, if you were lucky as I was, a dear friend could give you a recipe that you would adore. It stayed all these years in my recipe book, waiting for this moment to shine! It’s a wonderfully moist and comforting cake. Carob has magical ways to make you feel healthy and at the same time to be part of this sweet and delicious cake. It’s a Mediterranean tree and although it grows mostly along the Adriatic sea (I am referring to my background otherwise you’ll find carob in many other countries) if you go for a walk in one of Belgrade’s park called Topcider you will be pleasantly surprised by many carob trees! The park ground is literally covered with carob legumes at the  beginning of May, which is also a spring season.

According to some previous knowledge and recent google research – carob is rich with proteins, magnesium, calcium, iron and a whole list of vitamins like, A,B, B2, B3 and D. It found its way to the medicine as well, so as I told you – healthy and sweet. It has 40% of sugar! So let’s get back to the cake!

Carob cake

200 gr unsalted butter at room temperature

250 gr sugar

3 eggs at room temperature

100 ml milk at room temperature

200 gr oat flour

50 gr plain flour

100 gr carob powder

1 teaspoon vanilla paste

pinch of sea salt

1/2 teaspoon baking powder

100 gr jam of your choice for filling (I used strawberry jam as this is the most popular in our household, plus I believe that it’s matches this cake perfectly).

 

Whisk the butter and sugar until pale and fluffy (hand or stand mixer will do the same job). In a different bowl whisk lightly the eggs and add milk into it. Reduce the speed on your mixer while adding the egg and milk mixture. Once all is well combined add carob and on the end add flours and baking powder, spoon by spoon. Keep the speed of your mixer on low. Mix just until combined and poor into a lined 6″ baking tin.

Bake on 180C for an hour or until done (sometimes I find that I need more time to bake this cake, additional 10 minutes or so). Use the cake tester to make sure the cake is done.

Cool the cake on a cooling rack before cutting in two layers. Spread the jam onto the first layer and cover with the second layer. I never keep this cake in a fridge (but it can be done). It just changes taste a bit and I prefer when it’s nice and soft and on room temperature. The good thing in our case is that it never last for too long so room temperature is ok. Dust with icing sugar and slice into thin pieces as it is a very rich cake.